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Archive for the ‘William Patterson Blair’ Category

There has been some confusion as to the role of the Nathan Gammon family in Sarah’s life. Some sources have attempted to assign ownership of a young Sarah to the Gammons, based solely on the idea that it would have made sense given the fact that following the Civil War, Sarah did indeed change her last name from Blair to Gammon. Some researchers are eager to name Nathan Gammon’s second daughter, Jane Leticia (“Jennie”) as Sarah’s owner based on the fact that Sarah had some education when she arrived in the west, and Jennie was a devoted school teacher.

Jennie Gammon did in fact own a young slave girl at the time of the Civil War…her name was Lucy.

Another theory we encountered was that Sarah passed between the Blair and Gammon families through marriage. The connection between the Blair and Gammon families is not in question: Nathan Gammon’s oldest daughter, Elizabeth Hamilton Looney Gammon (b. 23 August 1825, d. 14 April 1898) married William Patterson Blair, son of John Blair III, on October 19, 1820, in Jonesboro, Tennessee, where both families were living at the time.

Following the marriage, William and Elizabeth Blair moved to Warm Springs (later renamed Hot Springs) near Ashville, North Carolina, where William operated a stage line. There is some evidence that the couple owned slaves while residing in North Carolina; however, none appear to be the correct age to be Sarah.

A brief history of what we know about Nathan Gammon and his immediate family will be helpful as we begin to unravel the complexities of Sarah’s late childhood and teenage years. Nathan Gammon was a close friend of the Blair family, and there are many connections between them that hold some bearing on our story.

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[COMING SOON!]

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Our search began in Knoxville for several reasons that have already been mentioned elsewhere: both the Blair and Gammon families had extensive roots there, and the family that brought Sarah west departed from that city in 1870. It seemed logical to start with what we knew – that at some point prior to departing for Montana with John Luttrell Murphy, Sarah was living in Knoxville – and work our way backward from there.

That researching slaves and former slaves can be tricky business goes without saying. Few researchers are lucky enough to stumble across first-hand sources that empirically pin down the whereabouts of a specific individual, especially in the tumultuous years surrounding the Civil War. But we had to start somewhere.

Through some primary research on Knox County, Tennessee, we learned that some of our suspects, the Blairs, had sunk roots in Tennessee a few counties to the east, in Washington County; there were also Blairs in Knoxville, and just across the state line, in South Carolina. All of them warranted further investigation, as did the Gammon family, which we believed owned some of Sarah’s relatives.

So our search began with Knoxville as a home base, and branched out from there to include Jonesborough, in nearby Washington County. We believe that to understand a person, you must understand where they come from -the things they saw, the places they went, the environment that shaped them. So first up: some Tennessee history.

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When we started this project, we were painfully aware of several competing versions of Sarah’s early life. Some sources said Tennessee. Others said South Carolina. Some said…well, almost nothing, to be honest. We believe that if you’re going to tell a story, you have to start at the beginning, and Sarah most certainly has a beginning to be uncovered. That became the primary mission of a recent research trip to Tennessee.

To narrow down our area of focus and define a clear starting point, we chose to start in Knoxville, Tennessee. We had good reason to believe that doing so was at least based on an educated guess, based on information that came from Sarah herself: on multiple Montana census records, she unwaveringly listed her place of birth as Tennessee, and we trust her recollection.

There is some logic behind the confusion, but the deeper we dug, the more it became clear that such confusion was a more recent phenomenon, stemming from the family that owned Sarah’s parents. We’ll discuss them in some detail in upcoming posts. For now, suffice it to say that before we dug into the Tennessee archives, there were several viable possibilities for the position of Sarah’s owner: John A. Blair was our primary suspect, but his brother, William Blair, his son, William Patterson Blair, and close friend Nathan Gammon were also potential candidates. The Blair and Gammon families shared closely intertiwned personal and business relationships, and it was not unreasonable to think that slaves might have changed hands between them prior to the Civil War.

We chose to start in Knoxville for several reasons:

1. There were Blairs living in Knoxville following the Civil War, in the period when Sarah would have left to come west.

2. Nathan Gammon was a resident of Knoxville in this period, and one often repeated story is that Sarah went to Knoxville following the Civil War to live with an aunt who was married to a Gammon slave.

3. John Luttrell Murphy, who brought Sarah west with his family in 1871, departed from Knoxville.

4. Most importantly, Sarah always maintained that she was from Tennessee, and we trust her! 

As a beginning, we’ll say that for the first time, we uncovered documentary evidence that allows us to make, at the very least, a good educated guess as to where Sarah was born and raised. We have tracked down family members and scoured records that make a strong case for an interpretation supporting Sarah’s statements that this is where she came from. Coming up, we lay out our case!

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